Regarding Microspikes

Recently there has been some chatter about using lightweight footwear in the winter hills, and in that context microspikes have been mentioned. As someone who uses microspikes a lot, I'd really like to warn quite emphatically against taking microspikes into the hills as a substitute for crampons -- in some ways wearing microspikes can be considerably more dangerous than just wearing boots without crampons. »

To Eat or not to Eat (contd)

The disillusionment with the M&S curry aside, the biggest factor that forced me to rethink camping food was running. While Scotland's hills provide superb playground from short jogs to long days, it is the linking of multiple days together that opens up, literally, whole new horizons. Alas, none of my previous approaches to cooking was suited to self-supported multiday runs. »

To Eat or not to Eat (Well)

I have always liked my food; perhaps it's because I come from a place that obsesses over wholesome home cooking. I also like my food now more than I once used to; perhaps it's because my adoptive homeland doesn't do food particularly well (doesn't really 'get' food).

A good meal is one of those little, simple, pleasures that can put a smile on your face when there isn't much else to smile about, and this fully applies to eating in the outdoors. »

Of Camera Bags

There is no end of acquiring them, the search for the perfect camera bag seems endless. Here are some of mine, and some thoughts on them. »

Thoughts on the Dumyat Path

If, like me, you thought we saw the last of the heavy machinery on Dumyat, you were wrong. In the last few days diggers have arrived again to (at the expense of SP Energy Networks) graciously bestow upon us a new path from the Sheriff Muir road car park to the very summit.

Updated 9/9/2017, 09:15; see the end. Formal complaints to be addressed to SPEN on customercare@spenergynetworks.com »

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GPS Accuracy and the Automation Paradox

It's been a busy summer for UK's MRTs. Not a week has gone by without someone getting lost in our hills, without yet another call to learn how to use a map and compass and not to rely on phone apps. This in turn elicits other comments that the problem is not in the use of digital tools per se, but in not being able to navigate. True as this is, the calls for learning traditional navigation should not be dismissed as Luddite, for not being able to navigate competently and the use of digital technologies are intrinsically linked. »

The Unfinished Business of Stob Coir an Albannaich

I have a confession to make: I find great, some might think perverse, pleasure at times in bypassing Munro summits. It is the source of profound liberation -- once the need to 'bag' is overcome, a whole new world opens up in the hills, endless possibilities for exploring, leading to all kinds of interesting and unexpected places. Plans laid out in advance become mere sketches, to be refined and adjusted on the go and on a whim. »

Eastern Mamores and the Grey Corries

The Mamores offer some exceptionally good running. The landscape is stunning, the natural lines are first rate, and the surface is generally runner-friendly. The famed (and now even raced) Ring of Steal provides an obvious half day outing, but I dare to say the Mamores have a lot more to offer! On the western end it is well worth venturing all the way to Meall a'Chaorain for the remarkable change in geology and the unique views of Ben Nevis, but it is the dramatic 'loch and mountain' type of scenery (of a quality rare this far south) of the eastern end that is the Mamore's true crown jewel. »

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The Debt of Magic

My gran married young, and was widowed young, my current age. I have a very few regrets in life, but not getting to know grandpa is one of them. He was a great lover of nature, a working man with little spare time, escaping into the woods with binoculars and a camera whenever he could. A passion borne out by countless strips of film left behind. As I am getting older I too am drawn into the woods, increasingly not for 'adventure', but for the tranquility and the sense of awe it invariably brings. »

The Case for 'Make No Fire'

I agree with David Lintern that we (urgently) need a debate about the making of fires in our wild spaces, and I am grateful that he took the plunge and voiced that need. But while I think David's is, by far, the most sensible take on the matter among some of the other advice dished out recently, I want to argue that we, the anonymous multitude of outdoor folk, need to go a step further and make the use of open fire in UK wild places socially unacceptable. Not making a fire is the only responsible option available to us. Not convinced? Here is my case. »